Don’t Be a Party to Underage Drinking

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The Oneida County Health Department’s AODA Community Coalition, along with the Department of Health Services  is partnering with Drug Free Action Alliance to sponsor Parents Who Host, Lose The Most, a campaign to educate communities and parents about the health and safety risks of serving alcohol at teen parties.

Drug Free Action Alliance developed the Parents Who Host, Lose The Most campaign to encourage everyone, especially parents, to send a unified message that teen alcohol consumption is unhealthy, unsafe, and unacceptable.

The Oneida County AODA Coalition wants to remind adults that they can be criminally prosecuted for hosting teen alcohol parties and be liable for injuries and property damage that may result from providing alcohol to teens. They also want to encourage interested community members to participate in spreading the word about Parents Who Host (PWH), by placing the PWH yard signs in prominent areas in the community.  If you are interested in putting a yard sign or poster, please contact the Oneida County Health Department at: 715-369-6142.

More information on Underage Alcohol use to go:

https://www.dhs.wisconsin.gov/publications/p4/p45718-14.pdf

Underage drinking is hazardous to health and safety:

According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, children who drink alcohol are more likely to:

  • Use drugs: Frequent binge drinkers are more likely to engage in risky behaviors, including using other drugs such as marijuana and cocaine.
  • Get bad grades: Children who use alcohol have higher rates of academic problems and poor school performance compared with nondrinkers.
  • Suffer injury or death: In 2009, across the U.S., an estimated 1,844 homicides, 949,000 nonfatal violent crimes such as rape, robbery, and assault; 1,811,300 property crimes, including burglary, larceny, and car theft were attributable to underage drinking.
  • Make bad decisions: Drinking lowers inhibitions and increases the chances that children will engage in risky behaviors or do something they will regret when they are sober.
  • Have health problems: Young people who drink are more likely to have health issues such as depression and anxiety disorders.

Tips to avoid being a party to teenage drinking:

  • Don’t be afraid to be the bad guy. Taking a tough stand on alcohol use can help youth say no when they are pressured to drink by their friends.
  • Talk with other adults about hosting alcohol-free youth events.  Unity creates a tough, enforceable message.
  • Set a positive example. If you host a party, always serve alternative non-alcoholic beverages and do not let anyone drink and drive.
  • Stay home if a teen is hosting a party in your home. Observe the activities and confiscate any alcohol that may brought by party goers.
  • Report underage drinking to the police promptly.
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Categorized as Alcohol & Other Drug Use Addiction (AODA), Blog - Injury Prevention and Safety, Blog - Smoking and Substance Abuse, Uncategorized

Contact Us

Oneida County Health Department
100 West Keenan Street
Rhinelander, WI 54501
Hours: 8:00am - 4:30pm Mon-Fri

Telephone (715) 369-6111
Fax (715) 369-6112

ochd@co.oneida.wi.us

To report a public health emergency or to report a notifiable disease after hours, please contact dispatch at 715-361-5100.

Click here to view map and additional contact information.

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Hotlines

Mental Health Hotline - Mental Health Crisis? Forest, Vilas and Oneida County call 1-888-299-1188.

Smoking Cessation - Break free of cigarettes. Call 1-800-QUIT-NOW.

Disaster Distress Line - Stress, anxiety, and other depression are common after a disaster. Call 1-800-985-5990 or visit the Disaster Distress Line to talk.

Wisconsin First Step – Information on services for children and youth with special needs, their families and providers. Call 1-800-642-7837 to speak with a parent specialist.

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